Online High School Courses

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Online Course Descriptions:

English I: This course is typically taken in the 9th grade. Through this course, students focus on grammar, literature, vocabulary, and writing. In grammar students learn the basics of good writing and build on the skills learned in previous years. The literature represents a variety of genres including short stories, plays, and novels. Writing practice includes various forms of essays as well as establishing a thesis, research, creating an annotated bibliography and becoming familiar with MLA format. All of this is implemented as preparation for the Gorman Q.U.E.S.T. research project, a requirement for all Gorman English students.  Students use the Sadlier-Oxford Vocabulary Workshop Level D book for vocabulary.

English II: This course is typically taken in the 10th grade. Through this course, students focus on grammar, literature, vocabulary, and writing. In grammar students learn the basics of good writing (constructing sentences and paragraphs) and build on the skills learned in previous years (phrases, clauses). The literature represents a variety of genres including short stories, plays, and novels. Possible selections include: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury, The Merchant of Venice by Shakespeare, and Lord of the Flies by William Golding. Writing practice includes narrative and persuasive writing as well as completing part of the Gorman Q.U.E.S.T. research project, a requirement for all Gorman English students. Students use the Sadlier-Oxford Vocabulary Workshop Level E book for vocabulary.

Human Geography:  Human Geography is the study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth's surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. This course will use these techniques to analyze the development of early human civilizations from the Neolithic Age through the first millennium A.D.  

Modern World History: This course is a basic survey of World History since 1450. The focus is on the change and continuity in international interactions and frameworks over time caused by political, intellectual, technological, economic, and social developments. 

Physics: This course is typically done in 9th grade and includes the following topics: mechanics (linear and projectile motion, Newton's laws of motion, momentum, energy, circular motion, gravity, special relativity); properties of matter (atomic structure, solids, liquids, gases); heat (temperature, heat transfer, phase changes, thermodynamics); sound and light (vibrations and waves, color, optics); electricity and magnetism (electrostatics, fields and potentials, current, circuits, induction); atomic and nuclear physics (quantum theory, radioactivity, fission, fusion). Students are invited to participate in on-campus labs or to do them at home or online.

Biology: This course is typically done in 10th or 11th grade and includes the following topics: the life of the cell; cellular reproduction and genetics; concepts of evolution; the evolution of biological diversity; animals form and function; plants form and function. Students are invited to participate in on-campus labs or to do them at home or online.

Chemistry: This course is typically done in 10th or 11th grade and includes the following topics: matter and change; measurements and calculations; atomic structure; electrons in atoms; the periodic law; chemical bonding; chemical formulas and chemical compounds; chemical equations and reactions; stoichiometry; states of matter; gases; solutions; ions in aqueous solutions and colligative properties; acids and bases; acid-base titration and pH; reaction energy; reaction kinetics; chemical equilibrium; oxidation-reduction reactions; electrochemistry; nuclear chemistry; organic chemistry; biological chemistry. Students are invited to participate in on-campus labs or to do them at home or online.

Honors Physics: This course is typically done in 11th or 12th grade and will prepare a student to take college physics or the AP Physics 1 exam (optional). This course uses more advanced mathematics (algebra-based) than conceptual physics. It includes the following topics: kinematics in one and two dimensions; vectors; dynamics; circular motion; gravitation; work and energy; linear momentum; rotational motion; vibrations and waves; sound; electric currents; direct circuits. Students are invited to participate in on-campus labs or to do them at home or online.

NOTE: Textbooks may be borrowed from Bishop Gorman and returned after the course ends, or they can be purchased online. 

Program Director

Stacy Trasancos, PhD

Director of Bishop Gorman Online

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